Publications

Frye exhibition catalogues are available online and by calling the Museum Store at 206 432 8201 or emailing .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Group Therapy

Text by Amanda Donnan


Distributed by the Frye Art Museum in conjunction with the exhibition Group Therapy. Includes a curatorial essay by Amanda Donnan, examining the themes and artists featured in the exhibition.

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8 pages,
Digital, 2018

Young Blood: Noah Davis, Kahlil Joseph, The Underground Museum

Edited by Maikoiyo Alley-Barnes & Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker

This catalogue is published by the Frye Art Museum on the occasion of the exhibition Young Blood: Noah Davis, Kahlil Joseph, The Underground Museum. Celebrating the life and legacy of painter, curator, and visionary artist Noah Davis (1983–2015), Young Blood places Davis’ work in the context of an ongoing visual dialogue with his elder brother, artist and filmmaker Kahlil Joseph. The catalogue features essays by Maikoiyo Alley-Barnes, curator of the exhibition; Helen Molesworth, chief curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Henry Taylor, Davis’ friend and fellow artist; and Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker, director emerita of the Frye Art Museum. The catalogue contains rich reproductions of the paintings, installations, sculptural, and filmic works in the exhibition. Young Blood is a celebration of black culture, spirituality, and creative legacy.

132 pages, 11 x 14 in. in.
Color illustrations throughout
Softcover, 2016

Genius / 21 Century / Seattle

Edited by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker

This catalogue is published by the Frye Art Museum as an archive of the exhibition Genius / 21 Century / Seattle (September 26, 2015–January 10, 2016). An unprecedented, large-scale celebration of Seattle’s exceptional multidisciplinary and collaborative contemporary artistic milieu, the exhibition featured over sixty-five visual artists, filmmakers, writers, theater artists, composers, musicians, choreographers, dancers, and arts organizations. The catalogue documents the installation, sculptural, and filmic works featured in the exhibition, and contains dynamic photographs of the more than forty events that took place over the course of the exhibition. Essays by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker and Erika Dalya Massaquoi, co-curators of the exhibition, reveal the multitude of perspectives shaping artistic practice in Seattle and the global community, while authors Courtney Sheehan and Jennifer Zeyl provide an in-depth view into the city’s film and theater communities.

300 pages, 9 3/4 x 12 1/2 in. in.
Color illustrations throughout
Hardcover, 2016

Cris Bruch: Others Who Were Here

Edited by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker

This beautifully photographed catalogue published in conjunction with the exhibition, Cris Bruch: Others Who Were Here, documents a new body of work by the multi-award-winning Seattle artist Cris Bruch. It features an essay by Frye Director Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker that provides historic information on the Great Plains, illuminating Bruch’s exploration of his family's roots as dryland farmers in eastern Colorado during the first half of the twentieth century. The catalogue also contains rich full-page reproductions of the installations and sculptural works in the exhibition that address the durability of hope in the face of obsolescence and decay.

48 pages, 9 x 8 in. in.
42 color illustrations
Softcover, 2016

Leo Saul Berk: Structure and Ornament

Edited by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker

This catalogue is published by the Frye Art Museum on the occasion of its exhibition Leo Saul Berk: Structure and Ornament and the exhibition The Uncertainty of Enclosure: Leo Saul Berk at INOVA (Institute of Visual Arts) at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. The catalogue features essays on Berk’s work by Frye Director Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker and INOVA Director Sara Krajewski; essays on the Ford House and the architect Bruce Goff by Sidney K. Robinson and John H. Waters; and a conversation between Leo Saul Berk and Scott Lawrimore. The catalogue also contains lavish reproductions of the installations and sculptural and filmic works in the exhibitions, including two new site-specific installations commissioned by the Frye. Through these works, Berk says, he hopes “to illuminate the transformative potential of exceptional architecture to positively shape our lives and creative imagination.”

84 pages, 10 1/4 x 11 1/4 in. in.
34 illustrations, 31 in color
Hardcover, 2015

Future Ruins: Rodrigo Valenzuela

Edited by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker

This catalogue is published by the Frye Art Museum in conjunction with its exhibition Future Ruins: Rodrigo Valenzuela, the first solo museum exhibition of multi-award-winning Seattle artist Rodrigo Valenzuela. The catalogue features an extended interview with the artist, and includes full-page reproductions of all seventeen photographs in the series Hedonic Reversal, as well as installation views of the large-scale Hedonic Reversal installation and El Sisifo, a three-channel video projection. These newly commissioned works encompass broad discussions on class, race, and labor. “My story,” Valenzuela explains, “is essentially one of coming from a blue collar family, a family of workers. As a worker myself, I want to make a larger statement about everyday life.”

48 pages, 9 x 8 in.
Color illustrations throughout
Softcover, 2015

1900: Adornment for the Home and Body

Edited by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker

This beautifully illustrated catalogue, published in conjunction with the exhibition 1900: Adornment for the Home and Body, captures the extraordinary richness of artistic production in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. With over 200 objects by artists, artisans, and architects of the fin de siècle from the collection of Seattle residents Wayne Dodge and Lawrence Kreisman, the exhibition provides an overview of ornamentation of the day in the fine and applied arts and the desire to unite all artistic disciplines in the Gesamtkunstwerk (total work of art) as proposed by composer Richard Wagner. The catalogue, with an essay by Frye Director Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker, documents the passage from these multidisciplinary experiments of the nineteenth century to the rise of figural and geometric abstraction in the twentieth.

36 pages, 9 x 8 in.
40 color illustrations
Softcover, 2015

Pan Gongkai: Withered Lotus Cast in Iron

Edited by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker

This catalogue is published by the Frye Art Museum in conjunction with its exhibition Pan Gongkai: Withered Lotus Cast in Iron, the first museum exhibition in the United States of distinguished Chinese artist Pan Gongkai (b. 1947). A contemporary master of ink painting, Pan Gongkai created a large-scale, site-specific ink painting extending the entire length of the museum’s largest gallery. An essay by Frye Director Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker reveals the artist’s early influences and the significance of the withered lotus.

23 pages, 9 x 8 in.
25 illustrations
Softcover, 2014

The Unicorn Incorporated: Curtis R. Barnes

Edited by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker
Texts by Curtis R. Barnes, Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker, and Ishmael Butler

This catalogue is published by the Frye Art Museum in conjunction with its exhibition The Unicorn Incorporated, the first museum exhibition to celebrate the work and career of Seattle artist Curtis R. Barnes. For over five decades, Barnes has worked as an artist, illustrator, muralist, and community advocate. In his sculpture, painting, and drawing, he employs imagery derived from his vast experience, mystical erudition, and heritage. Throughout the 1960s, '70s, and '80s, he produced searing social commentary in pen and ink, drawings that are as prescient and powerful today as they were then. The catalogue includes a poem by renowned musician Ishmael Butler, an extended interview with the artist, and an essay by Frye Director Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker on the legendary Omowale mural.

84 pages, 10 1/4 x 11 1/4 in.
96 illustrations, 50 in color
Hardcover, 2014

Mark Tobey | Teng Baiye

An 80-page catalogue, published by the Frye Art Museum in conjunction with the exhibition Mark Tobey and Teng Baiye: Seattle/Shanghai, the first exhibition in the United States to explore artistic and intellectual exchanges between Chinese artist Teng Baiye (1900–1980) and his American contemporary Mark Tobey (1890–1976). Essays by Frye Director Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker and scholar David Clarke consider Teng's influence as both a cultural interpreter and an artistic practice and–through Tobey–on the discourse on abstraction in midcentury American art.

80 pages, 10 1/4 x 11 1/4 in.
Color illustrations throughout
Hardcover, 2014

Franz von Stuck

Edited by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker
Essays by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker, Margot Brandlhuber, and Lauren Palmor

Published by the Frye Art Museum in conjunction with its exhibition Franz von Stuck. On the occasion of the 150th anniversary of Stuck’s birth and the 120th anniversary of his American debut, Franz von Stuck is celebrated in the first monographic exhibition of his work in the United States. The catalogue examines Stuck's theory of the spatial qualities of color; his influence on Josef Albers, Vassily Kandinsky, and Paul Klee; his breach with naturalism; and his willing embrace of the transformative ideas of his day. Essays document for the first time Stuck's participation in major international exhibitions in the United States and the reception of his work in the New World.

172 pages, 10 1/4 x 11 1/4 in.
117 illus., 60 in color
Hardcover, 2013

Buster Simpson // Surveyor

Edited by Scott Lawrimore
Essays by Scott Lawrimore, Carol Yinghua Lu, and Charles Mudede, and an interview with the artist

Published by the Frye Art Museum in conjunction with its exhibition Buster Simpson // Surveyor, a retrospective survey of forty years of the artist’s work. The first-ever monograph on Seattle artist Buster Simpson, a pioneer in the field of urban environmentalism and art in public spaces. The catalogue was produced with the environmental and recycling imperatives of the artist in mind: out-of-date textbooks and catalogues were salvaged for the covers and printer’s “book blanks” provided raw material to print the new pages. The blanks were torn apart, the pages cut to size, and each book was meticulously reassembled. Uniquely made, each book is unique

134 pages, 8 x 10 1/2 in.
282 illus., 211 in color, 2 maps
Hardcover, 2013

Nicolai Fechin

Edited by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker
Essays by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker and Lauren Palmor

Published by the Frye Art Museum in conjunction with its exhibition Nicolai Fechin. The exhibition provides a rare opportunity to recognize the accomplishments of this important émigré painter. With fifty-five paintings and drawings from the holdings of the Frye Art Museum, museums in the United States, and private lenders in both Russia and the United States, Nicolai Fechin concentrates on the early Russian period of the artist’s career, a period in which the Frye Art Museum has particular strength, and concludes with paintings from Fechin’s time in Taos and California. It is the first major overview of Fechin’s work at the Frye Art Museum since 1976.

80 pages, 8 1/4 x 10 3/4 in.
58 illus., full-color
Softcover, 2013

Beloved: Pictures at an Exhibition

Edited by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker
Essays by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker and Laura Landau

Published by the Frye Art Museum in conjunction with its exhibition Beloved: Pictures at an Exhibition and in celebration of the Museum’s 60th Anniversary. Charles and Emma Frye developed their passion for art at the 1893 Columbian Exposition in Chicago. They built a noteworthy collection of German art including works by the more experimental artists associated with the Munich Secession. The paintings collected by the Fryes were subsequently gifted to the people of Seattle and are now in the collections of the Frye Art Museum. Many of them are reproduced in Beloved: Pictures at an Exhibition, which also contains the first-ever comprehensive record of exhibitions at the Museum, 1952-2012.

112 pages, 10 1/4 x 11 1/4 in.
55 illus., full-color
Hardcover, 2012

Isaac Layman—Paradise

Edited by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker
Essays by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker and Doug Nufer and an interview with the artist

Published by the Frye Art Museum in conjunction with its exhibition Isaac Layman—Paradise. In a few short years, Isaac Layman (b. 1977) has established himself as an exceptional talent. In Paradise, Layman expands his practice of constructing large-scale, psychologically charged photographic-based visions of the spaces and objects found in his Seattle home. His most recent photographic constructions explore the desire to fabricate escapes, destinations, and monuments and the role discontent plays in driving the need to create imagined perfection. Isaac Layman—Paradise features twenty new works created especially for the exhibition. Layman believes that the paradise for which we often long “is the imagination and its projections.”

80 pages, 11 3/4 x 11 3/4 in.
37 color illus.
Hardcover, 2011

Gabriel von Max

Edited by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker
Essays by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker, Karin Althaus, Susanne Böller, Aleš Filip, Helmut Hess, and Roman Musil

Published by the Frye Art Museum in conjunction with its exhibition Gabriel von Max: Be-tailed Cousins and Phantasms of the Soul. One of the most discussed, and perhaps controversial, artists of the late nineteenth century, Gabriel von Max (1840–1915) “set hearts beating violently” with his paintings. Max’s portrayal of the biblical tale of Jairus’ daughter being raised from the dead, his polemical depiction of vivisection, and his paintings of his beloved, yet melancholic, monkeys engaged in various humanlike endeavors stirred the emotions and public debates of his day. Yet, despite international acclaim, Max has not been the subject of a solo museum exhibition in America until now.

128 pages, 11 1/4 x 10 1/4 in.
95 illus., full-color
Hardcover, 2011

Séance: Albert von Keller and the Occult

Edited by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker
Essays by Jo-Anne Birnie Danzker and Gian Casper Bott

Published by the Frye Art Museum in conjunction with its exhibition Séance: Albert von Keller and the Occult, this catalogue is the first English-language monograph on the Munich Secessionist artist. Swiss-born painter Albert von Keller (1844–1920) was highly regarded in Europe and America at the dawn of the twentieth century for his “modern” psychological painting. Keller’s participation in séances and occult experiments placed him at the center of passionate debates in fin de siècle Germany on Seelenleben, or the life of the soul. He was equally enthralled by traditional Christian narratives. He engaged in a lifelong search for new techniques and visual forms to describe shifting, uncertain states of being and becoming.

104 pages, 10 1/4 x 11 1/4 in.
54 illus., full-color
Hardcover, 2010

Catalogues: Listed by publication date